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ABC News(PHILADELPHIA) -- The father of one of 14 American Muslims who died serving in the U.S. Armed Forces in the ten years that followed the 9/11 attacks, took direct aim at Donald Trump Thursday night during a speech at the DNC, suggesting the GOP presidential candidate brush up on the Constitution.

"If it was up to Donald Trump, he never would have been in America," said Khizr Khan, whose son Humayun S. M. Khan, was killed by a car bomb in Iraq in 2004. "Donald Trump consistently smears the character of Muslims. He disrespects other minorities, women, judges, even his own party leadership. He vows to build walls and ban us from this country. Donald Trump, you’re asking Americans to trust you with their future."

With his wife at his side, Khan then said, taking out a pocket copy of the Constitution, "Let me ask you: have you even read the United States Constitution?"

He also told Trump to visit Arlington National Cemetery and look at the graves of soldiers of all faiths, crying out, “You have sacrificed nothing!”

Khan said of his son, a University of Virginia graduate, “Our son had dreams too…but he put those dreams aside the day he sacrificed his life."

He encouraged Americans to "take the time to get out and vote, and vote for the healer...not the divider."

In another nod to Trump, he said, “We cannot solve our problems by building wall sowing division. We are stronger together and we will keep getting stronger when Hillary Clinton becomes out president."

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iStock/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) --  The Baltimore police officers who were charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray are all back to work in paid administrative positions after charges were dismissed against the three remaining officers involved, according to the officers' attorneys and the Baltimore police union.

However, the officers still don't have their normal police powers, like making arrests. They will also face an internal affairs review that will determine whether or not they should be fired or disciplined.

The decision to dismiss the charges against Officers William Porter, Garrett Miller, and Sgt. Alicia White brought to an end one of the most closely watched police prosecutions in the country. Three other police officers were acquitted of all charges in separate bench trials by Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Barry Williams, including Officer Caesar Goodson, who faced the most serious charge of depraved-heart murder.

Baltimore’s Police Commissioner Kevin Davis has requested that police in Montgomery County and Howard County conduct the internal review. The two agencies will conduct their own interviews, take statements and complete an investigation to determine whether the officers violated any office polices or procedures. At the conclusion of the investigation, the findings will be presented to Commissioner Davis and his staff, who may hold an administrative hearing to determine what disciplinary actions need to be taken.

Four of the officers who were charged with felonies were suspended without pay last year, but they can seek back pay while the internal review is conducted. Earlier this month, the city agreed to pay Goodson more than $87,000 in back pay after he was acquitted in June.

Gray died one week after he suffered a fatal spinal injury in the back of a police transport van in April 2015. Shortly after, Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby announced the charges against the six officers involved in Gray's arrest.

Though the criminal investigation into Gray’s death is officially closed, prosecutors are standing firm in their belief that Gray’s death is a homicide.

“We do not believe that Gray killed himself. We stand by the medical examiner's determination that Freddie Gray’s death was a homicide," Mosby said Wednesday during a press conference.

 The Baltimore police union yesterday called Mosby’s comments “outrageous” and “uncalled for,” saying they believe Mosby has her own agenda.

“The best investigative unit in this country found no wrongdoing, and I can guarantee you, when they investigated that because there was an in-custody death, there was no stone left unturned,” Lt. Gene Ryan, president of the Baltimore Fraternal Order of the Police Lodge 3, said.

“Not one of these officers woke up wanting to do anything negative to anyone,” Ivan Bates, an attorney for White, said.

“Everybody wanted to find out what happened to Freddie Gray. The Baltimore City Police, they did the investigation, and they said it was investigation. The Baltimore City State's Attorney's Office had an opportunity to do an in-depth investigation, and they did not,” Bates said. “It is the Baltimore City State's Attorney's Office that has denied justice to the Gray family, denied justice to these officers."

Lead Prosecutors Speak Out

The lead prosecutors involved in the Gray case broke their silence Thursday, one day after Mosby announced she was dismissing the charges.

Chief Deputy State's Attorney Michael Schatzow and Deputy State’s Attorney Janice Bledsoe were tasked with trying to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the officers were negligent and criminally liable for Gray’s injury and subsequent death.

“I don’t think that we felt we were rushing, I don’t think we felt that there was material that was overlooked,” Schatzow said during a press conference Thursday morning. “We pieced together theory from facts.”

He added: “We can’t know what happened to Freddie Gray unless the people involved tell us what happened to Freddie Gray.” His comments echoed Mosby’s, who, in her decision to dismiss the remaining charges, slammed the Baltimore Police Department for being too biased.

“As you can see, whether investigating, interrogating, testifying, cooperating, or even complying with the state, we've all borne witness to an inherent bias that is a direct result of when police police themselves,” Mosby said.

In a statement, the Baltimore Police Department defended its investigation of the Gray case. "As the quality of this investigation has been called into question, [we] want to remind our residents that over 30 ethical, experienced, and talented detectives worked tirelessly to uncover facts."

Five of the six officers are suing Mosby and Maj. Samuel Cogen of the Baltimore Sheriff’s Office, the law enforcement officer who filed the charging documents against the officers. The lawsuits allege false arrest, false imprisonment, defamation, and other assertions. Mosby and Cogen have not commented on the lawsuits.

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iStock/Thinkstock(ORLANDO) -- A Florida man who was arrested for alleged drug possession says that what police thought was methamphetamine was actually just glazed doughnut crumbs.

"It's a terrible feeling to go to jail when you have not done anything,” Dan Rushing, 64, of Orlando, told local ABC affiliate WFTV. "I just don't want this to happen to somebody else."

Rushing said police found the crumbs of his bi-monthly Krispy Kreme treat in his car, and mistook the icing flakes for drugs after he was pulled over for a traffic violation.

"Every other Wednesday I stop at Krispy Kreme and get a doughnut there, and they found little, four little, flakes of the icing," Rushing said. “They said, 'We found what we thought was crack cocaine in the beginning, but now we think it's methamphetamines.'"

Rushing told ABC News today that he had just dropped his friend off at chemotherapy when he was pulled over by the police. "They said, 'Would you mind if I search your car?' and I said, 'I don't have anything to hide.'"

"Then they said, 'Well do you want to tell me about anything illegal in your car?'" Rushing said he told them he had no idea what they were talking about, and then they produced four doughnut crumbs "no bigger than your thumbnail."

"I kept telling them that's from a Krispy Kreme glazed doughnut," Rushing told ABC News, but says the police officer insisted it was drugs, and that it had tested positive as a controlled substance with their field kit.

"I said I don't know what to tell you about your test but I don't even know what methamphetamines are," Rushing said.

Rushing said he was then arrested and jailed for 11 hours where he was strip-searched and denied his spinal injury medication, which he needs to take every six hours.

"I'm not mad at this officer, but I just don't know where her judgement was," Rushing said.

He said that he has retained an attorney and will be filing a lawsuit against the police department. "The sad thing is I'm finding out a lot of people have gone through this all over the country, a lot of these tests are giving false positives," he said.

According to the Orlando Police Department incident report, Rushing was pulled over after going 42 miles per hour in a 30 mile per hour zone and not stopping before entering a roadway.

The police officer, an 11-year veteran of law enforcement, wrote in the report that she observed "rock like substance on the floor board where his feet were," and that she believed the substance to be "some sort of narcotic."

She conducted two field tests, and both of both came back positive for the presence of an amphetamine, according to the incident report, which also noted: "Rushing was placed under arrest and charged with possession of amphetamine with a weapon." Rushing had a weapons permit for his .38-caliber revolver, but it was confiscated, because under Florida statutes, it is unlawful to carry a weapon while in possession of what was at the time thought to be a controlled substance.

The evidence was submitted to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) for further testing, Sgt. Wanda Miglio of the Orlando Police Department told ABC News today. The results for the FDLE test were negative, so no charges were ultimately filed against Rushing by the State Attorney's Office.

Miglio emphasized that the arrest itself was lawful, "meaning that based on the officer's experience, and the field drug test that came up positive, probable cause existed to make a lawful arrest."

Miglio also added that the "the substance was not in fact found to be krispy kreme flakes. FDLE testing just determined it wasn't a controlled substance."


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Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- A man once convicted of the murder of Washington, D.C., intern Chandra Levy will not be retried, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia said Thursday.

The U.S. Attorney's office moved to dismiss the case charging Ingmar Guandique with Levy's murder after the office concluded that "it can no longer prove the murder case against Mr. Guandique beyond a reasonable doubt."

Guandique was convicted of Levy’s murder in 2010, but his conviction was later overturned.

The U.S. Attorney's office said Thursday it will not proceed with the retrial, saying that “recent unforeseen developments that were investigated over the past week led to this decision."

Guandique, who had been incarcerated while awaiting retrial, will, "pending action by the Court," be "released to the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, where he faces removal proceedings," the U.S. Attorney's office said.

Levy vanished in May 2001. Her remains were found the next year in Rock Creek Park in Washington, D.C.

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DigitalVision/Thinkstock(DALLAS) -- It was a frightening moment for the 130 passengers and six crew members on board an American Airlines flight Wednesday night.

American Airlines Flight 438, an Airbus A321, had just departed from Dallas-Fort Worth en route to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport when flames were seen shooting out of the back of the engine, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

One passenger, who wishes to remain unnamed, shot a video from inside the plane showing emergency crews waiting on the tarmac. The plane made a hard landing, but all passengers and crew members are safe.

American Airlines spokesperson Ross Feinstein said the plane had a mechanical issue, more specifically the compressor within the engine.

The FAA echoed that explanation, saying an engine problem caused "compressor stalls." Compressor stalls are similar to an engine backfiring.

An Airbus A321 can perform safely with only a single working engine.

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Paul Bartholomew(LOS ANGELES) — A blazing fireball streaked across the night sky on Wednesday, igniting a social media frenzy on the West Coast.

Residents of southern California all the way to Utah spotted a curious streak of light, and many took to the internet to find the answer, and share their own theories as to what it could possibly be.

Among the most popular suppositions were that this was the work of some kind of extra-terrestrial life, or that it was a meteor.

A NASA spokesperson told ABC News Thursday that the light was actually "the re-entry of a Chinese rocket body."

Social media users were nonetheless awed at the beauty of this flaming piece of space junk as it re-entered Earth's atmosphere.

WOW! Ian T. snapped this long-exposure pic near Page, AZ last night. Did you see the "space junk" in the sky? #abc15 pic.twitter.com/6Ydk11Fez5

— ABC15 Arizona (@abc15) July 28, 2016

Huge asteroid shooting star thing entering atmosphere over Vegas. July 27th 2016 9:40 p.m. pic.twitter.com/djdR3Xu6En

— Trevor Kerr (@AdmiralTrevMan) July 28, 2016

Correction, the object in question was not a meteor but rather a piece of "space junk." https://t.co/iJkQtddAG6

— NWS Salt Lake City (@NWSSaltLakeCity) July 28, 2016

Definitely a #UFO!!! pic.twitter.com/eB2mlnyrSh

— JoJo Wright (@JoJoWright) July 28, 2016

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A Florida man was arrested Wednesday night at New York City's Port Authority Bus Terminal after he allegedly made threats against officers at the Times Square-area transportation hub, according to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

The unidentified 18-year-old man was charged with illegal possession of a firearm, terroristic threat and unlawful possession of marijuana, the PANYNJ said.

"A man to whom the suspect was speaking approached PAPD and said the man had asked him if he wanted to 'off some cops' and claimed he had the gun in the bag," the PANYNJ said in a statement.

The PANYNJ said the suspect had a .38 caliber in a bag he was carrying when he was arrested at 8:35 p.m. Police got a warrant from the Manhattan District Attorney's Office, searched the bag and found the weapon.

The police were never directly confronted or threatened by this individual.

As of late Wednesday evening, the suspect was being held at the bus terminal pending removal to the Manhattan Criminal Courts.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The sudden flash of a red light camera in the rear-view mirror can certainly put a damper on a driver's day. But those pesky cameras might have saved lives, a non-profit says.

Cities that switched off their red light cameras between 2010 and 2014 saw a 30 percent increase in the number of fatal red-light-running crashes, a new Insurance Institute for Highway Safety study says. Meanwhile, cities that turned cameras on saw 21 percent fewer fatal red-light-running crashes than they would have otherwise, the study says.

Red light cams affect other types of dangerous driving behavior, too: Cities that terminated their camera programs saw a 16 percent increase in all types of fatal intersection crashes, and cities that debuted camera programs saw a 14 percent decrease.

Following criticism that cities' red light camera programs were more focused on making money than saving lives, many cities switched off their cameras. In fact, at least 158 communities have discontinued their programs in the last five years, and though other cities have activated cameras, the total number of cities with red light cameras has fallen from 533 in 2012 to 467 in 2015.

Red-light-running crashes led to 709 deaths and 126,000 injuries in 2014 alone -- and over half of those deaths were innocent bystanders: pedestrians, bicyclists, or occupants of vehicles struck by the red light runner, according to IIHS. But the organization says based on its research, red light cams have saved nearly 1,300 lives through 2014 -- while cities' cessation of red light camera programs has cost an estimated 63 lives, the organization says.

“Debates over automated enforcement often center on the hassle of getting a ticket and paying a fine,” IIHS President Adrian Lund said in a statement. “It’s important to remember that there are hundreds of people walking around who wouldn’t be here if not for red light cameras. Sadly, there are 63 families who are missing a loved one because these life-saving programs were canceled.”

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Hemera/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) —The jackpot for Wednesday's Powerball drawing was a whopping $422 million — but there were no winners, a California Lottery spokesperson confirmed to ABC News early Thursday morning.

Now, the jackpot has increased to an estimated $478 million. The next drawing is Saturday.

The jackpot has steadily been increasing, thanks to nearly three months without a winner of the big prize.

The numbers drawn Wednesday were 10, 47, 50, 65, and 68. The Powerball is 24.

The big Powerball prize comes less than three weeks after a player in Indiana won a $536 million Mega Millions jackpot.

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KABC(LOS ANGELES) — One person was killed and eight others injured after a car plowed through a Los Angeles home during a bible study session Wednesday evening.

Police said the driver of the car is still on the loose.

The incident happened around 8 p.m., when a female driver sped through the neighborhood and crashed into the house where a group of 11 elderly people had gathered for a prayer meeting, according to police.

Footage from a KABC Los Angeles news helicopter showed a red sedan almost completely inside the Harbor Gateway home, where it apparently came to a stop.

 

UPDATE: #LAFD now says 8 injured when car crashes into Harbor Gateway home https://t.co/mvZgkFEmSd pic.twitter.com/wXNJxebToA

— ABC7 Eyewitness News (@ABC7) July 28, 2016

 

Police said the female driver fled the scene, leaving behind a car with no license plates and no identification inside.

Some of the victims were stuck under the car and had to be rescued by firefighters at the scene, reports KABC. Victims of the hit-and-run crash ranged from their 40s to 80s, police said.

The Los Angeles Police Department is investigating the crash.


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iStock/Thinkstock(KEY WEST, Fla.) -- After a search that covered nearly 4,000 square nautical miles, crews Wednesday found four boaters -- including two children -- who were reported missing Tuesday night when they didn't return from a snorkeling trip off Key West, Florida.

The Coast Guard said the boaters were in good spirits and good health.

A concerned family member contacted the Coast Guard on Tuesday evening after the group -- David Thompson, 48; Adam Kelley, 28; Joshua Thompson, 15; and Evan Thompson, 11 -- did not return from their trip. They had been expected back before 4 p.m. that day, the Coast Guard said.

Search crews found the missing boat Wednesday nearly 40 nautical miles northwest of Key West, the Coast Guard said Wednesday afternoon.

The boaters left Banana Bay Resort in Key West on Tuesday in a 25-foot Grady-White to snorkel about 6 miles north of Key West.

The search was conducted by air and sea, the Coast Guard said.

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Columbia County Sheriffs Office(LAKE CITY, Fla.) -- About 3 kilos of cocaine were discovered on two JetBlue planes during routine maintenance of the aircraft in Lake City, Florida, a Columbia County Sheriff’s Office spokesman, Murray Smith, tells ABC News.

A maintenance worker discovered 1 kilo tucked behind some insulation inside a panel in the luggage compartment of one plane on July 20, Smith said. The panel's covering was screwed in, so someone would have had to unscrew it to stash the drugs inside the compartment, a part of the plane to which passengers don’t normally have access.

“This was not a hatch you just go up to and open,” Smith said. “Somebody had to know what they were doing to put it there.”

Four days later, on July 24, just under 2 kilos were discovered in the same place on another JetBlue plane, Smith said.

Some of the cocaine and its dark brown paper packaging have been sent to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for testing, Smith said. The state will look for fingerprints or DNA on the packaging and will test the drugs to try to figure out where the cocaine came from, Smith said. He estimated the street value of the drugs was about $180,000.

According to the Columbia County Sheriff's Office, which got the first plane’s itinerary history from JetBlue, the aircraft had most recently flown from the Dominican Republic to JFK International Airport in New York City before it proceeded to Florida. The Sheriff's department is still awaiting information on the second plane’s itinerary. When they get it, they’ll look for any destinations common to both planes.

JetBlue declined to comment, referring ABC News instead to local authorities. According to Smith, JetBlue aircraft have to be serviced every 90 days; in that time period, each plane is typically used in about 360 flights, both domestic and international.

Smith said the drugs could have been planted during any one of hundreds of flights prior to the routine maintenance check, adding that he’s “not convinced” the drugs were meant to land in Lake City.

The maintenance worker who discovered the drug stash on the first plane is employed by HAECO Americas. HAECO did not respond to ABC News' request for comment.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  The number of law enforcement officers killed in ambush-style attacks has increased dramatically this year, according to a report issued today by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, a finding its spokesperson called "especially troubling."

Sixty-seven law enforcement officers died in the line of duty this year as of July 20 -- a small increase from 62 deaths in the same period last year, according to the report. But of this year's 67 deaths, 32 were firearms-related -- which is a 78 percent spike from last year, when 18 deaths were firearms-related.

And of this year's 32 firearms-related deaths, almost half -- 14 -- were the result of eight ambush-style attacks against unsuspecting officers, according to the report. At this time last year there had been just three ambush deaths.

Forty-six officers were killed as a result of a criminal act so far this year, the report said -- double last year's number of 23. The criminal-related deaths this year were from shootings, traffic-related incidents, a beating, and an officer who died from illness contracted from 9/11 rescue and recovery work.

Texas has had the most officer fatalities with 13, followed by Louisiana with seven, in the wake of deadly, targeted attacks on officers in Dallas, Texas, and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, this month.

In Baton Rouge, three officers were killed on July 17 by a gunman who "intentionally targeted and assassinated" cops, according to police. The attack followed the death of Alton Sterling, a black man who was shot and killed during an altercation with Baton Rouge police officers on July 5. Protesters took to the streets nationwide after video surfaced of the encounter, which was followed the next day by a video of the fatal police shooting of Philando Castile, another black man, in Minnesota.

The Baton Rouge attack was also 10 days after the killing of five officers in Dallas by a gunman who reportedly said he was angry at police.

 In all of 2015, there were eight deadly ambushes, said Steve Groeninger, senior director of communications and marketing of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, and in all of 2014 there were 15.

"We're halfway through the year and already at 14," Groeninger said, calling the increase of ambushes "especially troubling."

And while Groeninger said the mass ambushes in Dallas and Baton Rouge are "terribly relevant," he added, "there have been other officer ambushes in the first half of the year." One was 28-year-old police officer Ashley Guindon, who was shot dead while on her first shift after being sworn in at the Prince William County Police Department in Virginia in February.

Despite what Groeninger points out to be an alarming 78 percent firearms-related spike from last year, he said this isn't the deadliest time ever for cops -- another dangerous year was in 1973, when at the midway point of the year, 84 officers had been shot and killed.

But police throughout the country are certainly on edge today, and deadly danger for police extends beyond ambushes. While ambushes made up 14 of the 32 firearms-related deaths, other firearms deaths were by incidents including handling prisoners and stopping a suspicious person, the report noted.

Of the non-firearms-related deaths, 24 were traffic related and 11 were from other causes, the report said.

Terrence Cunningham, president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, told ABC News that officer safety in the current climate can very difficult to achieve. He said some departments are taking "steps to try to keep officers safe in this current environment," like dual patrols. He said it's also been suggested that officers not write reports in their cars in the open and not eat in restaurants, instead returning to their stations.

Cunningham called it "really unfortunate" that "in a time we need to connect most with the community," these potential steps are "driving a wedge between the community and the police."

"Those [community interactions] are the interactions we need right now, and unfortunately that's being lost," Cunningham said.

Cunningham also gave insight into the mindset of police officers. He said officers are often responding to "people's worst day," and while citizens may think they are the only call that officer is responding to, the officer is really going to "call after call after call."

The tension is "palpable out there," he said, "and this cumulative effect of stress and trauma on the officers ... is something we have to deal with as a profession."

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ABC News(PHILADELPHIA) -- The mother of one of the victims of the Orlando nightclub shooting made an emotional plea from the stage of the Democratic National Convention as she called for commonsense gun policies.

Christine Leinonen, mother of Christopher Leinonen, told how her son and his boyfriend were among the 49 victims of the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history.

She recalled that when Christopher was born, she was a Michigan state trooper and the hospital put her gun away as she prepared to give birth.

“When I went into labor, the hospital put my off-duty gun in a safe. I didn't argue," she said. "I know commonsense gun policies save lives.”

“I'm glad commonsense gun policy was in place the day Christopher was born," Leinonen said. "But where was that common sense the day he died?”

Leinonen told how her son was an award-winning humanitarian who had started a gay-straight alliance at his high school.

“Christopher's paternal grandparents met and fell in love in a Japanese internment camp. So, it was in his DNA that love always trumps hate,” she said.

Leinonen spoke to ABC News in the hours that immediately followed the Orlando shooting, when at the time she did not know the fate of her son.

"Please, let's all just get along," Leinonen said while gasping for breath. "We're on this earth for such a short time. Let's try to get rid of the hatred and the violence, please!"

Among others who gave emotional testimonies on gun violence were former Arizona Congresswoman Gabby Giffords, who was shot in the head in 2011 and survived, and Erica Smegielski, daughter of the Sandy Hook Elementary School principal, Dawn Hochsprung, who was killed in a mass shooting at the Newtown, Connecticut, school in 2012.

Giffords spoke briefly, calling for the election of Hillary Clinton because "in Congress, I learned a powerful lesson: Strong women get things done."

"Speaking is difficult for me," Giffords said. "But come January I want to say these two words: Madam President."

Both Giffords and Smegielski campaigned for Clinton ahead of the convention, and Smegielski said that one reason she feels passionately about Clinton's bid is because the candidate reminds her of her mother.

"What we need is another mother who is willing to do what's right, whose bravery can live up in equal measure to my mom's," Smegielski told the assembled delegates tonight. "What we need is to elect Hillary Clinton as the 45th president of the United States of America so that no other daughter ever has to say, 'I would give every single day that I have left for just one more day with my mom.'"

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Stockbyte/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) — Prosecutors in Baltimore dropped all charges against the three remaining Baltimore police officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray despite holding firm in their belief that Gray's death was a homicide.

“We do not believe that Gray killed himself. We stand by the medical examiner's determination that Freddie Gray’s death was a homicide," Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby told reporters Wednesday morning, delivering a strong defense for her decision to prosecute six officers involved in Gray's death.

At the motion’s hearing for State v Garrett Miller Wednesday morning, prosecutors announced they would not pursue the remaining cases related to the arrest and death of Gray, bringing to an end one of the most closely watched police prosecutions in the country. The gag order against all parties involved, including prosecutors and defense attorneys and their clients, has also been rescinded.

“After much thought and prayer it has become clear that without being able to work with an independent investigatory agency from the very start, without having a say in the election of whether cases proceed in front of a judge or jury, without communal oversight of police in this community, without substantive reforms to the current criminal justice system, we could try this case 100 times and cases just like it and we would still end up with the same result," Mosby said, standing across the street from the location where Gray was arrested in April 2015.

Mosby charged six officers last year for their role in the arrest and death of Gray, a 25-year-old black man who died while in police custody after he suffered a fatal spinal injury while being transported in the back of a police transport van. Prosecutors aimed to show that the officers were criminally liable for failing to secure Gray with a seat belt after he was loaded into a police transport van.

Gray died seven days after sustaining injuries in police custody. On the day of Gray's funeral, the city of Baltimore erupted into violent protests and riots, followed by looting and arson.

“Those that believe that I’m anti-police, that is simply not the case, I am anti-police brutality," Mosby said, adding that she was elected as chief prosecutor for Baltimore City and took an oath to seek justice.

"I take my oath very seriously," Mosby said.

But prosecutors failed to convict four officers who were tried in separate trials earlier this year. All three officers who were acquitted opted for a bench trial instead of a jury trial, meaning Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Barry Williams decided the outcome of the trials.

Officer Edward Nero was found not guilty of all charges in May. Officer Caesar Goodson, who faced the most serious charge of second-degree depraved heart murder, was also found not guilty earlier this summer. And Lieutenant Brian Rice, the highest-ranking officer involved with the case, was cleared of all charges just two weeks ago.

Officer William Porter stood trial first and had chosen a jury trial. His trial ended in a mistrial last December.

All of the officers involved in the case had pleaded not guilty.

Prosecutors failed to prove in court that Nero, Goodson and Rice acted in a grossly negligent manner and that they were aware of the risks to Gray and acted unreasonably.

They were also unable to prove that the officers "corruptly" failed to carry out an act required of them. Throughout the trials, prosecutors tried honing in on each officer's experience and training, suggesting that they should have known the consequences of failing to secure a shackled prisoner without a seat belt.

Williams was oftentimes incredulous throughout the officers' trials, determining that prosecutors failed to bring any credible evidence into court that could prove that criminal wrongdoing had occurred when Gray was arrested and placed into the back of a police transport van.

During Nero's case in May, Williams grilled prosecutors during closing arguments — questioning whether a crime was in fact committed.

“So, every time there’s an arrest without probable justification — it is a crime?” Williams asked. “I’m trying to make sure it was a criminal assault. Touching Freddie Gray is assault?”

“We believe that the search and arrest without justification are assault, your honor,” Deputy State’s Attorney Janice Bledsoe responded. “There’s no question about that.”

Mosby said despite the acquittals from Williams, "We must respect the verdict rendered by the judge," and that her goal all along was to "always seek justice over convictions."

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