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Orlando Police Department(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- Suspected cop killer Markeith Loyd -- who was caught Tuesday after a nine-day manhunt in Orlando, Florida -- cursed at the judge in a profanity-laced first appearance in court Thursday morning.

Loyd, who was wanted for allegedly killing Master Sgt. Debra Clayton of the Orlando Police Department this month, was in court Thursday charged with killing his pregnant ex-girlfriend Sade Dixon in December. He told the judge he wants to represent himself in the court proceedings involving Dixon’s alleged murder. Loyd has not yet been charged in connection with Sgt. Clayton’s murder.

Loyd appeared Thursday with a bandage over his left eye, with his hands cuffed and with officers holding each of his arms.

In the murder suspect's profanity-laced tirade, he said to the judge about Dixon's murder, "Ya'll making up s--- like I just went in there and shot this girl, endangering my family. ... Ya'll portray this s--- to the news people like I just went in there and shot this girl."

"Ya'll been making up s--- the whole time," he said.

Loyd claimed he was beaten by police when authorities captured him as he tried to flee a home on Tuesday.

"They done took my eye. Broke my nose, broke my jaw," Loyd said. "Said I resisted, but I crawled out to the m--- f--- road. ... I didn't resist s---."

While leaving the courtroom, Loyd said to Judge Jeanette Dejuras Bigney, "F--- you."

Before Sgt. Clayton, who was also a wife and mother, was shot to death on Jan. 9, Loyd was wanted for the death of his former girlfriend Dixon and her unborn child, officials said. Loyd also allegedly shot and injured the former girlfriend's brother, officials said.

Charges against Loyd in connection with the Dixon case were read Thursday in court: one count of first-degree murder with a firearm, one count of unlawful killing of an unborn child, one count of attempted first-degree murder with a firearm and two counts aggravated assault with a firearm.

The Orlando Police Department said Loyd has not yet been charged for Sgt. Clayton's murder; the police expects that to happen this week.

Sade Dixon's mother, Stephanie Dixon-Daniels, said at court Thursday that she never liked Loyd and said he has no respect for law enforcement.

The judge on Thursday set no bond for Loyd's first three charges and set bond at $1,500 for each of the two aggravated assault charges. The judge said Loyd will have a determination of council hearing in one week. The judge also ordered Loyd not to contact his ex-girlfriend's family.

When Loyd was caught Tuesday, he was wearing body armor and carrying two handguns, including a Glock that contained a magazine with the capacity for 100 rounds of ammunition, Orlando Police Chief John Mina said. Loyd threw the guns to the ground and resisted arrest when police officers tried to detain him, police said.

Loyd suffered minor injuries in the scuffle with police and was kept at the Orlando Regional Medical Center until late Wednesday, police said.

The arresting officer's use of force will be investigated, per standard procedure, Mina said.

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ABC News/Jacksonville Sheriff's Office(JACKSONVILLE, Fla.) -- The South Carolina woman accused of kidnapping a newborn baby from a hospital in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1998 allegedly admitted to the crime over a year ago, according to court documents obtained by ABC News. Moreover, the stolen child knew she had been abducted, the documents showed.

Gloria Williams, 51, allegedly abducted Alexis Manigo on July 10, 1998, just hours after she was born at a Jacksonville hospital and raised the girl as her own in South Carolina. Williams allegedly posed as a nurse and told the baby's mother that the newborn had a fever and she needed to take her away, according to Jacksonville Sheriff Mike Williams.

Williams, who has not yet entered a plea, was arrested at her home in Walterboro, South Carolina, on Jan. 13 and charged in the nearly two-decade-old kidnapping case.

According to the affidavit for the woman’s arrest warrant obtained by ABC News, the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office received two anonymous tips last year from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The first tip, which authorities received on Aug. 8, stated that Manigo told her friend that she was kidnapped as a baby and is listed as a missing person. The tip also provided authorities with Manigo’s current name, according to the affidavit.

The second tip, which authorities received three months later, stated that Williams confessed to taking Manigo from a hospital in Jacksonville, saying she had renamed the girl and claims her as her daughter. The tip also stated the two were living in Walterboro, according to the affidavit.

Detectives with the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office said they interviewed two witnesses who confirmed the anonymous tips, according to the affidavit. The first witness provided a sworn statement that approximately a year and a half ago Williams confessed to him that she “stole” a baby from a Jacksonville hospital and that she renamed the baby Alexis Manigo, according to the affidavit.

A second witness provided a sworn statement that approximately a year-and-a-half ago Manigo told her that she had been kidnapped from a hospital in Jacksonville when she was a baby. According to the witness, Manigo said Williams told her she was named Kamiyah Mobley at birth, the affidavit said.

ABC News chief legal affairs anchor Dan Abrams said it’s unlikely Manigo will be charged in the case if she was in fact aware of her own abduction and chose not to report it to police.

“She’s a victim,” Abrams said on ABC’s Good Morning America Thursday. “She was stolen away from a hospital, she was brought up by the only mother that she knew, so you have to sympathize with her plight.”

Williams was extradited from South Carolina to Florida on Tuesday, according to the Jacksonville sheriff. She returned to Jacksonville for her first court hearing Wednesday morning, where a judge set no bond on the kidnapping charge but set bail at $503,000 on the interference with custody charge, citing the unique circumstances and the gravity of harm alleged by prosecutors.

Williams is next scheduled to appear in court on Feb. 8.

On Jan. 10, Jacksonville detectives arrived in Walterboro and determined that a birth certificate and social security card for Manigo were fraudulent. The social security number listed with Manigo’s name was issued to a male in Virginia, who died in 1983, according to the affidavit.

DNA testing showed that Manigo, now 18, was not Williams' biological daughter. Oral swabs recently submitted by Manigo were compared to DNA samples that had been collected and preserved from Manigo's birth. The result was a positive match, according to the affidavit.

Manigo, who was given the name Kamiyah Mobley at birth, was reunited with her biological mother and father last week. She appears to be a normal 18-year-old in good health, according to the Jacksonville sheriff.

However, in an exclusive interview that aired Wednesday morning on GMA, Manigo said the reunion was bittersweet because the woman she knows as “mom” was taken away from her.

"I understand what she did was wrong, but just don’t lock her up and throw away the key," Manigo said. "I still think of her as mom, she will always be 'mom.’”

Manigo identified herself during the interview as "Alexis Manigo," but she said she is fine with people calling her by her birth name. She said Williams was "a great mother.”

"She made one mistake, but I was loved," Manigo said. "From that one mistake, I was given the best life."

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Bob Levey/Getty Images for U.S. Fund for UNICEF(HOUSTON) -- Former first lady Barbara Bush is being treated for bronchitis, family spokesman Jim McGrath told ABC News Thursday.

Barbara Bush, 91, entered Houston Methodist Hospital Wednesday morning as a precaution after suffering fatigue and coughing. She had not been feeling well for a couple of weeks but is resting comfortably, McGrath said Wednesday.

McGrath said the former first lady reported feeling "1,000 percent better" Thursday morning.

"Antibiotics and some good rest seem to have restored her to better health," McGrath said in a statement Thursday.

It's unclear when she will be released from the hospital.

Her husband, former President George H.W. Bush, has been hospitalized at the same medical center since Saturday. He was transferred to the intensive care unit Wednesday for "an acute respiratory problem stemming from pneumonia," McGrath said in an initial statement.

The 92-year-old former president underwent a procedure “to protect and clear his airway that required sedation,” the statement said. George H.W. Bush remained in the ICU in stable condition Thursday, according to the family spokesman.

"His medical team is actively evaluating him for extubation, and we are hopeful he will be discharged from the ICU in a few days," McGrath said in a statement Thursday.

Doctors initially believed the 41st president would be allowed to return home later this week after several days of treatment, but his stay was extended. An earlier statement from the family spokesman had said there was no timetable for his release.

During his final presidential news conference Wednesday afternoon, President Obama said he had been in touch with the family about the Bushes' conditions.

"They have not only dedicated their lives to this country. They have been a constant source of friendship and support and good counsel for Michelle and me over the years," Obama told reporters. "They are as fine a couple as we know, and so we want to send our prayers and our love to them. Really good people."

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iStock/Thinkstock(MOUNT HOLLY, N.C.) -- The residents of Mount Holly, a town in North Carolina, have been puzzled by a mysterious "loud boom" that reportedly shook several homes earlier this week.

The Mount Holly Police Department "received more than 30 calls from various parts of the city and even neighboring communities" about the noise on Tuesday evening, said Chief of Police Don Roper.

"People were saying they heard a very loud boom or explosion or loud bang, and some folks said it shook their houses and rattled the windows," Roper told ABC News Thursday.

"It sounded like a bomb just went off outside our house," one caller said, according to 911 audio obtained by ABC's affiliate WSOC in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Several officers immediately went out that night to check areas where callers reported hearing the sound, according to Roper.

But they found "nothing," he said. "There was no evidence of any type of injuries or damage."

There have been several other reports of similar loud noises in the area this past week, Roper said.

One was identified as a train releasing its air brakes and another was an "atmospheric disturbance" -- but what caused the "loud boom" on Tuesday evening remains a mystery, Roper said.

"There's certainly been a lot of chatter and theories on social media, but we weren't able to confirm anything," he said. "We do want people to know we do not feel there is any danger or cause for concern."

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Twitter/@FLOTUS(WASHINGTON) — With just hours remaining until Michelle Obama goes from being first lady to mere mortal, she took to her social media accounts Wednesday to bid adieu to her soon-to-be former life.

"Being your First Lady has been the honor of a lifetime. From the bottom of my heart, thank you. -mo," the first lady wrote on her Twitter and Instagram accounts alongside a photo of her and the president with their arms around each other. Shot from behind, the first couple are looking toward the Washington Monument from a White House balcony.

Being your First Lady has been the honor of a lifetime. From the bottom of my heart, thank you. -mo pic.twitter.com/pahEydkZ5Z

— The First Lady (@FLOTUS) January 19, 2017

Prior to posting the photo of her and the president, Michelle Obama tweeted a 30-second video of herself taking one last stroll through the White House with the first pooches, Bo and Sunny.

"Taking it in on one last walk through the People's House," reads the tweet.

Taking it in on one last walk through the People's House. pic.twitter.com/uaAn6j8Ygy

— The First Lady (@FLOTUS) January 18, 2017

The trio begin their stroll in the Cross Hall, and meander through the South Portico side of the first floor, then to the East Room, Green Room, Blue Room and Red Room,

White House photographer Pete Souza also took to his Instagram account Wednesday, posting a photo of the president giving his final press conference before leaving office. In the photo, Obama is seen waving to the pool of reporters. "Waving goodbye at the conclusion of his last press conference as President earlier today," Souza wrote.

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iStock/Thinkstock(FAYETTEVILLE, Ark.) — The divisive campaign season and the subsequent election of Donald Trump left many in the country very emotional and searching for ways to express their feelings.

Suki Highers, a sociology teacher at Fayetteville High School in Fayetteville, Arkansas, found that her students were in a similar state of mind.

“The day after the election, the school was kind of an emotional wreck,” said Highers. “And I don’t think anybody knew really how to navigate it.”

So Highers came up with a solution. She gave her students an assignment: write a letter to the incoming president.

“I didn’t feel comfortable talking about it,” said Highers. “I knew the kids had a lot of feelings that they needed to get out of them, and so I decided that the safest way was to let them write a letter.”

Every one of her students wrote a letter to the president-elect, telling him what they'd like to see accomplished when he assumes office. The letters will be mailed soon.

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Pinal County Sheriff's Office(ELOY, Ariz.) --  Two skydivers collided midair in Arizona Wednesday but survived the mishap despite one person falling unconscious, police said.

Around 10:30 a.m. the Pinal County Sheriff's office received a call detailing the skydiving accident in Eloy, Arizona.

The unconscious skydiver's parachute deployed at the emergency deployment altitude, police said, but he was unable to control it and came in for a hard landing. He was airlifted to a hospital, where he is currently in surgery, police said. His condition is unknown at this time.

The other skydiver was not injured in the collision, police said.

The investigation into the collision will be turned over to the Federal Aviation Administration, police said.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- President Obama defended commuting the prison sentence of Chelsea Manning during his final news conference of his administration.

The commutation of Manning was announced Tuesday prompting questions about what will happen to other people who leak government information.

"I feel very comfortable that justice has been served and that a message has still been sent that when it comes to our national security," Obama said Wednesday.

"Chelsea Manning has served a tough prison sentence," Obama said. "So the notion that the average person who was thinking about disclosing vital classified information would think that it goes unpunished, I don't think would get that impression from the sentence that Chelsea Manning has served."

Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison in 2013 and she will now be released on May 17. Her lawyer released a statement after the announcement that her sentence was commuted saying that her time in prison included "long stretches of solitary confinement -- including for attempting suicide."

Obama was asked about a tweet from Wikileaks which said that if Manning was granted clemency, founder Julian Assange apparently offered to be extradited from the U.K. to the U.S. "despite clear unconstitutionality of DoJ case."

"I don't pay attention to Mr. Assange's tweets," Obama said. "And I refer you to the Justice department for any criminal investigations, indictments, extradition issues that may come up with him."

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Gerardo Mora/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Noor Salman, the wife of Orlando, Florida nightclub gunman Omar Mateen, entered a not guilty plea to the federal charges against her, through her public defender John Paul Richmond, who represented her in court Wednesday.

The U.S. attorney's office claims Salman aided and abetted Mateen's "provision of material support" to the terrorist group ISIS, also known as ISIL. Salman is also accused in the indictment of misleading federal agents and Fort Pierce, Florida, police officers who questioned her about Mateen's attack at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando on June 12, 2016. The attack killed 49 people; Mateen was killed in a police shootout after the attack.

Salman -- who was wearing a red prison jumpsuit Wednesday -- did not speak in court. As she was taken out, she waved and blew a kiss to her uncle, Al Salman, who waved and blew a kiss back.

It was announced Wednesday that once certain paperwork is completed, Salman will be represented by attorney Charlie Swift, who was present in the back of the courtroom. Swift will, however, preside next to Salman during a pre-trial interview Wednesday.

Salman's next hearing was set for Feb. 1. Until then, she will remain in custody in California.

She is expected to be extradited to Florida, where the indictment was filed.

Salman was taken into custody by the FBI on Monday. On Tuesday, charges against her were read aloud in court.

On count one, she was charged with aiding and abetting Mateen's attempted provision and provision of "material support or resources" to a foreign terrorist organization. For this count, she could face up to life in prison and a $250,000 fine.

"She knew he was going to conduct the attack," Assistant U.S. Attorney Roger Handberg said in court.

On count two, she was charged with obstruction of justice. She could face up to 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

When Judge Donna Ryu asked Salman Tuesday if she understood the charges, she quietly replied, "Yes."

Linda Moreno, another attorney for Salman, said in a statement to ABC News on Monday, "Noor Salman had no foreknowledge, nor could she predict what Omar Mateen intended to do that tragic night. Noor has told her story of abuse at his hands. We believe it is misguided and wrong to prosecute her and that it dishonors the memories of the victims to punish an innocent person."

Al Salman on Tuesday called his niece a "very simple person" who is "not that smart." He was adamant that she was clueless about Mateen’s plan.

He told ABC News Wednesday that when his niece's son saw the news on TV of his mother's arrest, "he hid behind the couch."

He said he spoke to his niece last night on the phone. "She said she needs some clothes because she's cold, and then she asked about her son," he said.

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Bob Levey/Getty Images(HOUSTON) -- Former President George H.W. Bush and former first lady Barbara Bush have been hospitalized in Houston, Texas, according to the former president's office.

The former president, 92, has been admitted to the intensive care unit at Houston Methodist Hospital to "address an acute respiratory problem stemming from pneumonia," his office said in a statement.

"Doctors performed a procedure to protect and clear his airway that required sedation," the statement read. "President Bush is stable and resting comfortably in the ICU, where he will remain for observation."

As a precaution, former first lady Barbara Bush, 91, was also admitted to the Houston Methodist Hospital Wednesday morning for fatigue and coughing, the statement said.

In his final presidential press conference Wednesday afternoon, President Obama said he had been in touch with the Bush family about the former president and first lady.

"They have not only dedicated their lives to this country, they have been a constant source of friendship and support and good counsel for Michelle and me over the years," President Obama said. "They are as fine a couple as we know and so we want to send our prayers and our love to them. Really good people."


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iStock/Thinkstock(JACKSONVILLE, Fla.) -- The South Carolina woman accused of kidnapping a newborn baby in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1998 returned to the River City for her first court hearing Wednesday morning.

The judge set no bond for Gloria Williams on the kidnapping charge and set bail at $503,000 on the interference with custody charge, citing the unique circumstances and the gravity of harm alleged by prosecutors. Williams is next scheduled to appear in court on Feb. 8.

Williams, 51, allegedly abducted Alexis Manigo on July 10, 1998, just hours after she was born at a Jacksonville hospital and raised the girl as her own in South Carolina. Williams allegedly posed as a nurse and told the baby's mother that the newborn had a fever and she needed to take her away, according to Jacksonville Sheriff Mike Williams.

Earlier this month, authorities determined through DNA testing that Manigo, now 18, was not Williams' biological daughter after the teen submitted a DNA sample. She now appears to be a normal woman in good health, the sheriff said.

Williams, who has not yet entered a plea, was arrested at her home in Walterboro, South Carolina, early Friday and charged in the nearly two-decade-old kidnapping case. The woman was extradited from South Carolina to Florida on Tuesday, according to the Jacksonville sheriff.

Manigo, who was given the name Kamiyah Mobley at birth, was joyfully reunited with her birth mother and father last week. But the teen said the reunion was bittersweet because the woman who raised her was taken away from her.

"I understand what she did was wrong, but just don’t lock her up and throw away the key," Manigo told ABC News' Good Morning America in an exclusive interview.

"She loved me for 18 years, she cared about me for 18 years," Manigo said. "I just want people to realize that."

Manigo identified herself during the interview as "Alexis Manigo," but she said she is fine with people calling her by her birth name. She called Williams "a great mother" and said, "she will always be 'Mom.'"

"She made one mistake, but I was loved," Manigo said. "From that one mistake, I was given the best life."

"I had everything I ever needed, wanted, I had love especially. There is no price you can put on the love that was given to me," she added.

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Orlando Police Department(ORLANDO, Fla.) -- When the man wanted for allegedly gunning down a veteran police sergeant in Orlando, Florida, was caught by police after a nine-day manhunt, he was armed with guns and a magazine with the capacity for 100 rounds of ammunition, police said.

Markeith Loyd -- who was wanted for allegedly killing Master Sgt. Debra Clayton as well as a pregnant woman -- was fleeing a home Tuesday when he was caught, according to cops.

He was wearing body armor and carrying two handguns, including a Glock that contained a magazine with the capacity for 100 rounds of ammunition, Orlando Police Chief John Mina said. Loyd threw the guns to the ground and resisted arrest when police officers tried to detain him, police said.

John Cohen, an ABC News contributor who is a former U.S. counterterrorism official, said the massive magazine Loyd allegedly had can hold an "extraordinary amount of bullets." Cohen said a weapon like the one Loyd was alleged to be carrying "only has one purpose -- to allow the shooter to fire continuously without having to reload."

Cohen said these drum magazines -- which are readily available online -- pose a real challenge for law enforcement because violent criminals can use them to carry out attacks or to defend themselves while they're being sought.

Cohen said the high-capacity magazine -- in addition to the fact that Loyd was wearing body armor -- shows Loyd was "prepared to take on the police" who came to arrest him.

"In the hands of a violent criminal, this type of high capacity magazine could be extraordinarily dangerous, and result in the death of people including police officers," Cohen said.

Orange County Sheriff's office officials said Tuesday that Loyd would be charged with two counts of first-degree murder with a firearm, two counts of aggravated assault and one count of attempted homicide.

Officials said before Clayton was shot, Loyd was wanted for the death of his former girlfriend and her unborn child. Officials said Loyd also allegedly shot and injured the former girlfriend's brother.

Records Wednesday show that Loyd was booked on charges of first-degree murder with a firearm, unlawful killing of an unborn child, attempted first-degree murder with a firearm and two counts aggravated assault with a firearm. The sheriff's office did not immediately respond for comment on why records show one murder charge.

He suffered minor injuries in the scuffle with police, Mina said. Loyd is at the Orlando Regional Medical Center and it is unclear when he will be moved to the Orange County Jail. His first court appearance is not clear.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — Eighteen years ago, Alexis Manigo was snatched from a Florida hospital as a newborn and spent her entire life being raised by a woman, Gloria Williams, who wasn't her mom.

Recently, after DNA testing, Manigo, who was given the name Kamiyah Mobley at birth, discovered her true identity.

But instead of harboring ill will towards the suspect, Manigo, who is still reeling from the discovery, called her "a great mother."

"That’s all I want people to know," she told Good Morning America in an exclusive interview. "She was a great mother."

"I will never have malice for her," she added. "I will always love her."

Williams, 51, allegedly snatched Manigo from a hospital in Jacksonville, Florida just hours after she was born, and has been arrested and charged with the kidnapping. Williams, who has not yet entered a plea, will make her first court appearance today.

Earlier this month, authorities revealed that they used DNA testing to determine that Manigo was not Williams' biological daughter, and that the teenager was the victim of a decades-old kidnapping case.

"I understand what she did was wrong, but just don’t lock her up and throw away the key," Manigo pleaded.

"She loved me for 18 years, she cared about me for 18 years," Manigo said. "I just want people to realize that."

"She made one mistake, but I was loved," Manigo said. "From that one mistake I was given the best life."

"I had everything I ever needed, wanted, I had love especially. There is no price you can put on the love that was given to me," Manigo said.

Manigo added that the attention that she has been getting has been "overwhelming." Last week, she was joyfully reunited with her birth mother and father, saying, "when you find a new family, it's just more love."

She added that the reunion was bittersweet because it also meant that the woman who raised her was taken away from her.

"For some it's a victory," Manigo said. "But at the same time you do take a loss when someone so dear to you is just snatched like that."

Manigo said she is still processing everything that has happened, and though she identified herself as "Alexis Manigo," she said she is fine with people calling her by her birth name.

"It's all a bit much for me, but if you know me by 'Alexis' continue to call me 'Alexis', if you know me as 'Kamiyah,' then you can call me that to. I'm not really specific right now. I haven't even thought about that, I'm just taking it one step at a time," Manigo said. "I don't want any malice with anybody."

"Regardless of what you refer to me to, I know who I am, I’ve never questioned myself," Manigo said. "I know who I am as a person."

Williams was extradited from South Carolina to Florida on Tuesday but Manigo said, "I still think of her as mom, she will always be 'Mom.'"

Manigo said it has been hard for her to deal with the comments and judgment that has been directed on Williams and her online.

"They want me to hate her, and it's not in me to," Manigo said.

Manigo's attorney, Justin Bamberg, told GMA that people online have made hurtful comments directed towards Manigo and Williams.

"Until you are in that situation, I don't think you should be so quick to judge," Bamberg said. "I want you to ask yourself, 'What would I say if I woke up tomorrow and I found out that my mother was not my mother?'"

"Anybody can be bold behind the keyboard, that’s the new thing," Bamberg added. "Be upset, but also be mindful that there is an innocent 18-year-old who is left to deal with this."


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ABC News(WASHINGTON) — The transition of power from one president to the next brings a tremendous amount of change to the White House. But the impact extends far beyond 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

This year, that shift will also be felt in one of Washington, D.C.’s most historic neighborhoods — Sheridan-Kalorama.

The Obama family is moving from the most famous house in the nation to private residence on a quiet, tree-lined street less than three miles away.

Obama is not be the first former president to live in the Northwest D.C. neighborhood. Five other presidents called Sheridan-Kalorama home either before or after their presidencies: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Herbert Hoover, Warren G. Harding, Woodrow Wilson and William Howard Taft. That means Obama will be the first president to move to the neighborhood since Wilson in 1921.

Despite Sheridan-Kalorama's appeal among past presidents, one longtime resident says she's “surprised” the Obamas chose to move there on Jan. 20.

“I’m surprised the president would move to a neighborhood where the houses are so close together — but I suppose the Secret Service knows how to take care of that,” said Sally Berk, a professional historical preservationist who has lived in Sheridan-Kalorama for 36 years.

“I’ve never been inside the house, but it's known that it has nine bedrooms,” Berk said of the Obamas' new home. “It’s a little over 8,000 square feet, but in our neighborhood that’s not unusual.”

Berk believes the home may have been chosen by the first family because it has ample parking. She suspects it can “accommodate probably eight cars in the parking lot and another two in the garage.”

“The best amenity, after the parking lot, is probably the swimming pool,” she said. “While I don’t expect Obama to invite me over for dinner, I’d be happy if he invited me over for a pool party.”

Learn more about Sally Berk and the Obamas “Next Chapter” in Kalorama in the video below.

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Orlando Police Department(ORLANDO, Fla.) — Orlando police say that they have caught alleged cop killer Markeith Loyd, who was also wanted for killing a pregnant woman.

Around 7 p.m. Tuesday, authorities located Loyd in an abandoned home, Orlando Police Chief John Mina said during a press conference. Police surrounded the home, but Loyd tried to escape through the back of the home before the SWAT teams arrived, Mina said.

Loyd then ran back inside the home and left again through the front door, wearing body armor and carrying two handguns, including a Glock that contained a magazine with the capacity for 100 rounds of ammunition, Mina said. Loyd threw the guns to the ground and resisted arrest when police officers tried to detain him.

He suffered minor injuries in the scuffle and was treated by firefighters, Mina said.

Markeith Loyd was wearing body armor when he was apprehended. And had these guns in his possession. pic.twitter.com/T0AfzZibmA

— Orlando Police (@OrlandoPolice) January 18, 2017

On Dec. 9, Orlando Master Sgt. Debra Clayton was on duty by herself near a Walmart around 7 a.m. when a citizen approached her, telling her that a murder suspect was nearby, according to police.

Clayton found Loyd and chased him, police said. He allegedly opened fire after Clayton told him to stop running. He was already wanted before he shot and killed Clayton for allegedly killing a pregnant woman.

Clayton, a wife and mother, was shot multiple times, police said. She was wearing body armor at the time, but she later died. A funeral for the slain officer was held over the weekend.

Loyd was placed in Clayton's handcuffs when he was caught, as part of a "tradition" in law enforcement that goes back "many, many years," Mina said.

These are Lt. Debra Clayton's handcuffs. Markeith Loyd was placed in these when he was arrested. pic.twitter.com/3TKs9nw2lu

— Orlando Police (@OrlandoPolice) January 18, 2017

Orange County records show Loyd was booked on charges of first-degree murder with a firearm, unlawful killing of an unborn child, attempted first-degree murder with a firearm and two counts aggravated assault with a firearm.

Great police work got this cop killer and the killer of Sade Dixon and her unborn child off the street. pic.twitter.com/MkAdoHwZmM

— Orlando Police (@OrlandoPolice) January 18, 2017

One of the first people Mina said he called after Loyd was caught was Clayton's husband, Seth Clayton, who expressed both relief and concern that Loyd was captured just around the corner from the home of Clayton's mother, Mina said.

Authorities launched a massive manhunt last week in response to Clayton's death. Law enforcement was able to locate Loyd by "tireless" and "great police work," rather than anonymous tips, Mina said. Several agencies, including the Orlando Police Department, the Orange County Sheriff's Office, U.S. Marshals, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, the Metropolitan Bureau of Investigation, Homeland Security and the FBI participated in the hunt for Loyd. Last week, the reward for information leading to Loyd’s capture was raised to $125,000.

"I was extremely happy that this dangerous person was off the streets," Mina said when asked by a reporter why he was seen smiling in the video of Loyd being led into the police station.

More arrests are pending for anyone who helped Loyd evade police, Mina said. The investigation has revealed that Loyd received help and the home that he was found in has ties to some of his associates, Mina said. Police do not know how long Loyd was in the home before he was caught, the police chief said.

An investigation of the arresting officer's use of force will be launched, per standard procedure, Mina said.

In a statement, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said Loyd will be "held to the fullest extent of the law."

"It is sickening that anyone would commit senseless violence against our brave first responders," Scott said. "Ann and I continue to pray for the families of the fallen heroes and hope today's news provides some relief.”

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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